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DT’s Tower: Steel Margins

“Uh oh!  A Lord is going to be talking about profit margins” *run away*

Those aren’t the kinds of margins that I’ve been thinking about this month (honestly!). What I’ve been thinking about mostly are ‘margins of error’.

Nobody’s Perfect

It is a fact that none of us are perfect (sorry to break that to you).  I have yet to find anyone who has not confessed at some point in their life that they have made a mistake or things haven’t gone as planned.  In fact most of the interesting stories and the biggest learning come from when things don’t go right. 🙂

I’d also argue that the majority of us, regardless of profile, have a degree of perfectionism about us.

Perfectionism… A Friend of Procrastination

From what I’ve been thinking there are two reasons for perfectionism.

The first is about the desire to get things right.  This is most clearly evident in the Dynamo profiles of Mechanic, Creator and Star.  Intuitively they know that something isn’t quite right and like having an itch they can’t scratch they can delay doing anything until they get it right.

From the Mechanic wanting to ensure every little detail is perfect to the Star who insists that something doesn’t look right.  The problem they often encounter is because the source of their perfectionism is intuition they can’t easily explain or identify what is wrong.  They just ‘know’.

The second reason for perfectionism is insecurity.  This is the area of the Tempos, the Deal Makers, Traders and Accumulators.  Likely they will have a (full) list of points drawn that they will work through.  Unless a time limit is imposed it is likely that they will keep finding fault and making small ‘tweaks’.

Obviously both types of perfectionism isn’t good in order to get things done.  Don’t get me wrong, I am a Lord so I can appreciate the drive for perfectionism.

The devil is in the detail after all!

Delegation and Margins of Error

So are Blaze profiles guilty of perfectionism?  Well, they can be but as their talent is people they generally know the right people to get things done (and they are the ones who are usually perfectionists).  When they give feedback they can oscillate between Dynamo ‘doesn’t look right but I can’t put my finger on it’ or Tempo ‘here is a list’.

Now we come to the Steel profiles.  And an interesting thing happens, I think.  I have been accused of perfectionism.  I have also been accused of pragmatism.  Now both can’t be right can they?  What I have realised in terms of thinking about the way I look at it is that I never expect 100% (I might desire it but I know reality gets in the way most of the time).  I do sometimes oscillate between ‘something not right’ and ‘the list’.  Yet, in order to resolve either of these quandaries there is the margin of error.

So, for me, there is an acceptable margin of error.  That can shift depending on what is being worked on but I’d give it a range between 80% – 99%.

I don’t stick my finger in the air and go I’m in a 99% mood today but rather it is based on several variables:

1. How much time is left before planned completion?

2. Is there flexibility in terms of time after completion to improve?

3. How serious is the margin of error?  A seatbelt with a 20% margin of error is a bit different from a business card with a 20% margin of error 😀

It annoys the HELL out of the Dynamos I work with and confuses the Tempos no end.

Yet ultimately, this margin of error allows for decisive decisions and getting things done.

Do you have margins of error?  Or are you a perfectionist?


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Nicci’s Call: Trusted Sales at the Trust Conference

By Nicola Bonfanti – Talent Dynamics for Sales

“Trust” and “selling” are not always concepts that go hand in hand in people’s minds. For that reason I was gratified that my talk “Trusted Sales: People to People Selling” at the recent Trust Conference was packed out.

Also, nearly everyone in the room gave me their contact details to get the free report I had prepared for the event. Anyone who has done a talk or an exhibition stand will know how difficult it is these days for people to give up their contact details.

For the past year I have been researching the ways the 8 Talent Dynamics profiles have success in sales, have blocks in selling and therefore how I can help them be more successful.  I’ve shared some of this in my blogs here along the way.

Based on this, here is the 3 step plan to win better business that I shared with the room on 11th September.

1. Establish the Sales Dynamics profiles of your sales team (or at least yourself)

I have looked at many sales cycles adopted by different companies and found the common activities and sales skills match the 8 Talent Dynamics profiles (See above).  As a result, the  Talent Dynamic for Sales Reports (available later this year) show the strengths and challenges of each profile as a sales person, their best role in the Sales Cycle and the value they give to the sales team and the client.

Knowing your own Sales Profile gives you confidence and insights into how you can add value to the client as a salesperson.

For example, a Trader is great at resolving problems, at giving excellent customer service so is well suited to incoming inquiries and complaints that other profiles with less patience would not handle well.

Whereas a Creator sales person is best with new clients, spotting opportunities and helping the client come up with new joint ideas for growing their business, that others hadn’t thought of before.

2. Place the sales team members in the role they are best suited to within the sales cycle

A sales team full of Stars will generate a lot of interest but may leave sales on the table through lack of follow up, for example.

Some salespeople may be pretending to be a Star as feel that is a “typical” attribute of a salesperson when in fact their true Accumulator profile is just what the team needs to do the planning, research and put together competitive tenders. So once the Sales team has completed their profiles, we can help them fulfil their potential by placing them in the right role for them in the sales team.

3. Focus on your clients

As I have mentioned in previous blogs, the most important thing in trusted selling is to put the client first.   Imagine the power of Talent Dynamics for Sales in creating better relationships and better understanding between buyers and sellers, so not only do you understand your own strengths , challenges and value as a sales person but you understand what drives your buyers to buy.

I didn’t have time to cover as much as I wanted on this aspect, so I’ve put a free Sales Success report together for you that you can implement ideas from immediately. If you missed the session and would like a copy you can get it from http://trustedsalesdynamics.com/resources/e-guides/

I am  passionate about making sales a trusted profession, making people feel proud to be a salesperson and I was gratified that so many people at the Trust Conference felt the same and wanted to be part of the Trusted Sales  Movement.


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The Dynamic Dozen of Real Estate Sales

In the highly competitive world of Real Estate, a high functioning sales team is vital, followed closely by quality listings to satisfy their hunger to sell. One high profile South East Queensland agency turned their struggling sales team full spin into a dynamic force within months, using the guiding force of Talent Dynamics profiling techniques.

Profiled by Rebecca Mitchell, Talent Dynamics Master Trainer and Performance Consultant from Brisbane, this team of twelve real estate professionals achieved some surprising results.

From Flagging Sales…

Sluggish sales and unmet targets were an early warning sign that the team were falling out of step, despite a strengthening property market.

The General Manager knew every individual had the qualities of a great salesperson, yet somehow their motivation was lagging their ability. So he brought in Talent Dynamics Master Trainer, Rebecca Mitchell to decipher the cause of their failing KPI’s.

Each rep took a Talent Profile test. The GM had assumed all profiles would be Stars– known for their prowess as promoters and delivering results, or Supporters – able to reap sales with their Blaze energy leadership. But the Talent Dynamics profiling results proved different.  From the eight reps only three were Stars and one a Supporter, complemented by a Deal Maker, two Traders and one Accumulator.

By understanding how their Talent Profile powered their performance, the team identified changes that would take them into rapid flow.

But what quickly turned their team into a “dynamic dozen” was working together to change how each person went about selling that also complemented the others.  Their new goal: to increase revenue by $100,000 over the following 6-12 months.

The Stars came up with the strategies to help the Deal Maker, Traders and the Accumulator, instantly inspiring and reducing competition between them. Each eased into action – and their natural flow.

To Flogging It!

Over the following weeks, the sales team completely changed their focus and responsibilities. The Deal Maker shifted to partnering with other agencies and financiers in the region.  The Trader took over the ‘walk ins’ and incoming phone and website enquiries. The Accumulator concentrated on telesales and follow-up sales, as well as reporting weekly sales figures. The Supporter took over the Office Manager role and recruited a small team of three commission-only sales agents who worked closely with her – running information evenings, connecting with the local Chamber of Commerce, promoting their office and running monthly events.

The three Stars continued with traditional listing strategies by marketing direct to home owners. They also featured at the monthly events, each month in turn, which further developed them into their own area of expertise; one in apartments, one in standard priced houses and the other in executive homes and house and land sales.

Within six months the team had exceeded their initial $100,000 target! They are now set to increase their bottom line by $500,000 by the end of this year.

This shining real estate firm has jettisoned their motivation and their performance to new levels by embracing Team Dynamics at its best.


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Nicci’s Call: Leveraging the Value of Your Sales Meetings

By Nicola Bonfanti – Talent Dynamics for Sales

Lots of sales people make the mistake of talking too much in the first meeting with a new prospect, anxious to tell them everything about their company, products or services. The big opportunity of a first meeting is to discover the real scope of the prospect’s problems, by talking at them they will miss opportunities.

So use the first prospect meeting as a fact finding mission rather than a chance to roll out your usual presentation.

You are there to identify opportunities and find a mutual fit to see if and how you can actually help them. They should be doing most of the talking for 4 reasons

  1. So you can get a proper understanding of their issues so your proposal back to them can be tailored to those
  2. So you can lead and guide the meeting in the direction you want it to go
  3. So you don’t give away any of your expertise content now but just explain to them what they need to do, not how. That comes once you are working together
  4. If you don’t already know what their Talent Dynamics profile is, you will be able to get an idea from their conversation.

If you do know their Talent Dynamics profile, plan your questioning to accelerate the rapport building.

Dynamo Prospects

Start by focusing on them

  • Ask them to give you an overview of where the company is at and their role in it
  • Do they see big changes on the horizon?
  • What are the key issues that matter to them?

When talking about a product or service you have to help them,

  • Use a few key points to give an overview
  • Let them know the significance of the product or service to them personally as well as to the organisation
  • Point out new or innovative features and why that will benefit them
  • Speak in an animated manner and at a fairly rapid pace

At the end of the meeting ask them:

“How do you see us working together?”

Blaze Prospects

Start by focusing on them

  • Ask them to tell you how things are at the organisation, pick up on specific events or people you’ve heard about or that they’ve mentioned and ask about them
  • Ask them what they have heard about you and your organisation

When talking about a product or service you have to help them,

  • Give specific examples and case studies of other customers’ good experiences
  • Be personable and smile a lot as they will see that as a sign of acceptance
  • Speak in a casual, frank and friendly manner
  • Stay on task and don’t get too distracted by stories

At the end of the meeting ask them:

“Have you heard enough to make a decision about moving forward together?”

Tempo Prospects

Start by focusing on them

  • Ask them what they thought about the information you have sent them so far
  • Involve them in the process by asking what they thing about things in the organisation today
  • Ask them what would they change if they could

When talking about a product or service you have to help them,

  • Take time to go over a full list of advantages and benefits
  • Explain any side benefits or peripherals that are pertinent
  • Provide testimonials that highlight facts
  • Move at a steady, even pace

At the end of the meeting ask them:

“How would you like to take the next step forward?”

Steel Prospects

Start by focusing on them,

  • Ask them how business is doing
  • Ask them what improvements they are looking to make this year or this quarter
  • Ask them what they know about you so far

When talking about a product or service you have to help them,

  • Know your stuff, winging it will not cut it with them
  • Be able to show a bottom line on prices, features and benefits to them
  • Highlight any productivity benefits to them
  • Show them all the specifications
  • Take your time

At the end of the meeting ask them:

Do you need any further information to take a decision to move forward together?

Then make plans for the next meeting together.

Who will you try this approach with first?

More information about how you can leverage the value of your sales meetings at www.TrustedSalesDynamics.com

Nicci Bonfanti will be leading one of the Break- Out sessions at the Trust Conference on September 11th.


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Nicci’s Call: Are You Challenging Enough?

By Nicola Bonfanti – Talent Dynamics for Sales

Last week I attended the global online conference “The Sales Acceleration Summit”. The first  keynote speaker was Matt Dixon, co-author of “The Challenger Sale” and almost every talk I attended after that made reference to the most effective type of salesperson – the Challenger.

So what is the Challenger sales person, why is it important if you are involved in selling at all and how can knowing your Talent Dynamics profile help you become more challenging?

Why does it matter?

According to the CEB research*, and this is what has been sending shock waves through sales departments globally since its publication in 2012, the typical relationship builder salesperson, i.e. Making sure the customer is happy, being of service, keeping relations sweet, (what most of the sales training of the last 10-15 years has been based on) was the LEAST effective sales person type, particularly in an economic downturn, and not only with complex sales but in almost every sales situation.

Instead the MOST effective type of sales person in every situation proved to be the Challenger type who understood the customer’s business, pushes the customer to think outside the box, doesn’t ask them what keeps them up at night but teaches them what should be keeping them up at night and is not afraid to build constructive tension with the client, to make them think.

What is a Challenger sales person?

A Challenger salesperson excels and outperforms other sales types in 3 key areas:

  1. Teaches for differentiation – is an expert in their field and brings a new perspective to the client and educates them in other ways of doing business.
  2. Tailors for resonance – understands what drives value with different customers and adapts their message accordingly  (which your understanding of your client’s Talent Dynamics profiles will help you do).
  3. Takes control – not afraid to take control of the conversation or discuss pricing and cost concerns with the customers on their own terms.

How can you be more challenging?

Before you try and take on these 3 areas it’s important to remember what your strengths as a sales person already are and how you can build on that to become more challenging. Which is your strongest energy in your profile?

Dynamo profiles
(Creator, Mechanic, Star) – you will be naturally good at teaching for differentiation, will have great ideas for improvements and changes. Your challenge will be to listen more to the client and understand their specific values and to tailor your proposal to their needs rather than your ideas.

Utilising your knowledge of Talent Dynamics profiles and applying that to your clients will help with listening.

Blaze profiles
(Supporter, Star, Deal Maker) – you will naturally be good at tailoring for resonance, adapting your ideas to the client’s specific expectations.  You may be fearful of taking control of the conversation and discuss finances, not wanting to “spoil” the relationship.

Having courage to talk finances for the good of the client and your ongoing relationship will help you overcome this.

Tempo profiles
(Trader, Deal Maker, Accumulator) – you will naturally be inclined to make sure the customer is well served, is happy and there are no tensions there.

In order to win and keep the client you need to explore with them new ways that your products and services can resolve not only their current issues but issues in the future.

Steel profiles
(Lord, Accumulator, Mechanic) – you will be comfortable about taking control of the sales meeting but may not have enough knowledge or ask enough questions to tailor the proposal in an original and stimulating way.

Use the data and research you have to demonstrate to your client how they could be using your products and services in different ways.

More information about how you can become a more challenging salesperson at www.TrustedSalesDynamics.com

Nicci Bonfanti will be leading one of the Break- Out sessions at the Trust Conference on September 11th.

*CEB research in “The Challenger Sale “ (2012) by Matthew Dixon and Brent Adamson


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Jans Corner: Which Profiles makes for the best Leader?

We often get asked which of the Talent Dynamics profiles are the best leaders. On the surface the answer might seem very easy. Of course, the Supporters. Given their people focus, blaze energy, and extroverted action dynamics, Supporters are best at leading teams and organisations as they bring others together and motivate them to be their best naturally building collaboration, trust and loyalty critical for sustained high performance.

High profile Supporters, such as GE’s Jack Walsh, eBay’s Meg Whitman or Microsoft’s Steve Balmer, have shown how much they can accomplish if they put their talent at work.

This natural talent, however, doesn’t give Supporters a monopoly on leadership. Everyone can be a leader. Businesses are complex ecosystems and different talents come handy at different times and in different situations. All profiles can bring a valuable perspective and energy that can be used to build performance and increase flow depending on the teams focus, task at hand, nature and stage of business or season of the economic cycle.

Let me give you a few ideas about how to make the best use of the leadership potential of the other seven profiles (apart from the Supporter) in the team or businesses context.

Creators might not be the best people-people or data-driven analysts, but they lead best by setting the vision and a high standard to reach for. Being task focused to start things they lead others to reach their goals. They are best at the helm of new projects and initiatives, thinking out of the box and out of the ordinary. They are the best initiators and pioneers.

Stars are fast and often don’t wait for their team to catch up or bother with the details, but they will give energy and credibility to new ideas, projects, programs or strategies through the power of their personality. They can improvise while leading upfront to build and maintain excitement, momentum and buy in when it matters. They are the best promoters.

Deal Makers are true people’s people, but they are more private than a Star or Supporter, and prefer to work one-to-one. They bring people and opportunities together and lead best when they are able to be in constant conversation whilst listening closely to what is happening around them. They are the best connectors and negotiators of win-win solutions.

Traders thrive when they can build and grow a connection with their team or customers. They might be paralysed when facing a blank sheet to fill, or strategy to create, but will quickly make sense of what is going on around them. They lead best when immersed in daily action, when timing is of essence and when they have ongoing input from their environments and people to inform their decision-making. They are the best operations leaders and excel as hands-on troubleshooters.

Accumulators are excellent project managers given their analytical skills and sense of timing. They are reliable and will find the way to deliver what is needed on time. However, they have little interest in and are ill equipped to handle office politics. Accumulators lead best when a well defined task or project needs to be accomplished and when the detail and risk management are critical for success. They are the best planners, and project and risk managers.

Lords are great at finding inefficiencies because they patiently track data, analyse the detail and strive to stay in control. For this reason, Lords are best at leading through the numbers instead of through conversation and collaboration. Lords almost always value process and policy over people, and are great at providing leadership when resources and finances are tight and success requires efficiency and precision. They are the best data-driven analytics and efficiency leaders.

Mechanics constantly look for improvements and as a result they are continually challenging the status quo on the way things are done. This can be very stimulating for some, and very frustrating for others. The best way to for them to lead people is to make it easy for others to collaborate and perform indirectly, not through motivation but by perfecting the underlying processes, procedures and systems. They are the best systematisers, improvers and finishers.

If you currently experience frustration or ineffectiveness of leadership in your team or business, it might be that you are trying to put a square peg into a round hole. As businesses and demands evolve so will the need for the appropriate leadership. Chances are that you will not need to re-organise the whole team or organisation. For a start, just notice whose talent can help most with the task or challenge at hand and provide them a space to contribute it at the right occasion. Build from small opportunities, for instance, just allowing the right person to lead a meeting or spearheading a project – and then expand from there. The reward will be a more resilient and better performing team as well as increased engagement and flow of everyone in it.


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Unas Spotlight: Why Innovative People Fail

I was intrigued when I recently read this Forbes article titled ‘Why Innovative People Fail’ to see that the author and commentators were so close to a workable solution, yet so far at the same time.

While the idea of getting another person involved to complement the innovator’s strengths is mooted, the concept of how a team could add value is not fully explored.

Perhaps this is partly because the ‘idea monkeys’ (and as a Star profile I’m one of them!) do enjoy significance & freedom and they could feel that a team would tie them down. This couldn’t be further from the truth.

It is interesting how I have learned that every time you wish to switch up a level, you often need to do the opposite of what you were doing before. Counterintuitive I know…

Where the right team dynamics can really add value is not just in supporting the execution of an idea but in actually helping to select the best ideas to carry forward in the first place.

The innovator, often a Creator profile, can be amazing at generating new ideas and strategies. However, their sense of timing is frequently off, usually with them being ahead of the crowd and more importantly the market.

In addition to having great timing, dealmakers and traders are also closer to the customer and so can assess the Creator’s ideas from that viewpoint. Stars can ensure that the idea is marketable and Supporters that the best team is in place to execute it.

Of course what is also essential is to have an Accumulator/Lord and/or Mechanic to ensure that the best use of data is made and the right systems and processes are in place for repeated success.

Unfortunately, what happens in many teams is that the Creator can be sensitive to criticism of their idea or strategy, which stops feedback in its tracks and consequently prevents their plans being more robust. This increases risk and the likelihood of failure.

If the team is unaware of the value that they all add to the innovation process, then there is the danger that they will be constantly moved from working on one idea to the next before anything has the chance to be completed.

An idea could be brilliant, however it may simply cost too much to execute and/or to promote, especially if this means entering new markets. It could even be taking the company totally off track in terms of where it as an organisation adds the most value to the marketplace.

The three Dynamo energy profiles, Mechanic, Creator and Star, will all innovate constantly. The trick to innovation success though, is to have the right structures and parameters in place to ensure that their innovation reaps rewards.

Understanding how value and leverage lead to accelerated trust and flow provides parameters that often result in six-and-seven-figure returns.

Having the right team dynamics gives you a structure that supports identifying and executing the best opportunities for your organisation over and over again.

So before you automatically dismiss or jump on the next great idea, consider with your team is it really the best idea for your team, for your organisation and your market at this time?


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TD 2.0 Launching very soon…

I wanted to give you some prior notice of an exciting update! Over the past few months, Roger and the team here at TDHQ have been working on the development of the Talent Dynamics Profile reports.

We’re calling it TD 2.0!

The updated report, as well as all of what you have come to expect, now also contains:

Explanation on Value and Leverage

The leadership style of your profile

How you communicate with others and the best way to get into Flow

The best environments for your profile to flourish

The emotional needs of each of the Frequencies

There is now information on all 8 profiles as well, so you can see at a glance an overview of the others in your team…

and much much more!

It’s grown from 10 to 18 pages and is packed with even more content about your profile!

We are letting you know now, as early in September, we will contact you to let you know that we are almost ready to go live with TD 2.0 and before we do that, as you have already taken a profile test with us previously, we want you to be able to download the new version of your own report, absolutely free.

The opportunity to download the new report for free will be available for a limited period only, so please don’t miss it.

In addition, we will also be gifting you a free copy of the new book that Roger and I have created about Talent Dynamics.

Look out for the updates coming from us in the next few weeks as you will have exclusive access to the new reports and the TD book before anyone else sees them!

 


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Una’s spotlight: Are You Operating in the Emotional Economy?

I was fascinated by this article from Jim Clifton of Gallup, ‘Good to Great? Or Lousy to Good?’

What Clifton is really talking about here is adding value to your customers. He’s calling this moving from ‘price to advice’, a nice snappy catchphrase to encompass the idea of choosing to build relationships over being a commodity. I think the article has some great examples of this, particularly with the author’s own organisation and why it’s choosing to stay with its current telephone supplier. Basically they have become a true partner.

We all have heard the wonderful examples of customer service that are worth talking about. I wonder though if they seem to you like those stories of families where the children are well behaved and they all get along, sounds amazing yet unrealistic?

The fact is that it doesn’t have to be that way. We talk a lot about value too, however we don’t just mean at the front line, as employees need to receive that great value from within the organisation itself.

The company needs to be clear about the value it delivers to its customers and focus on growing that value and leveraging it effectively. ‘Price to advice’ is one approach yet it’s not the only way to add value. It’s simple, there’s two ways to add value: innovation and timing and there’s two ways to leverage that value: through people and systems.

Employees must be connected to the Spirit energy of the company. No I’m not going woo woo on you, I’m talking about the organisation’s purpose, what it exists to do. Employees have got to be connected to who they truly are, how they each add value and how they can best leverage that value within and between teams, departments and divisions in ways that truly make a difference to the customer.

Clarity and alignment at all levels are absolutely vital. From what’s really important to achieve as an organisation in the next few months, to what to focus on in the next few days. When employees know if they are a Star profile that excels when shining their light on a product, project or team or an Accumulator that shines by making things happen on time, it helps everybody to have clear expectations and ramp up their performance.

All this helps for:

  • Employees to figure out the best career paths for success
  • Managers to understand the best roles and accountabilities for team members for employee engagement peak performance
  • Senior executives to know who’s best to lead on critical projects and how to support them
  • Teams to work together on organisational priorities instead of competing for resources
  • Every single person in a company to understand what their role is in adding value to the customer

This is what encourages customer to have a positive emotional relationship with your organisation, to be truly engaged. When this happens then you’re operating in the ‘emotional economy’ – think of the almost fanatically loyal customers that Apple and Southwest Airlines attract and keep. We’d all like more of those!

Increasing value and leverage throughout your organisation allows you to be sustain success and to scale that success and still keep your customers engaged.

How true is this for your organisation? What could you do to increase your value and leverage so you too operate in the emotional economy?


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Jumping out of a plane without a parachute.

Michelle ClarkeI was disappointed recently to hear a leadership guru extolling the virtues of optimists over pessimists in a presentation. He was suggesting that Optimists are more successful in life and business. They have all the fun, the right attitude and get the best results.

What disappointed me was, we know, as you do, that it takes all sorts to make your business and team successful. There is certainly not a sustainable, one size fits all leadership style – oh and just how near impossible it is to swap from being a natural pessimist to becoming an optimist!

One of the TD profiles, who is a natural Optimist is the Creator profile. They live life with their head in the clouds, creating beautiful bold plans and new possibilities. It’s this natural optimism that allows them to get started on their plans, that they often haven’t yet finalised the details of, as they know they will figure it out as they go along. They inspire the team to action, with their boldness and beautiful descriptions of what will be and they get on with it.

Without Creators, teams would find it challenging to come up with big bold plans that keep them way ahead of the game and innovations that customers are going to just love!

So yes, I agree Optimism is very important!

However, Pessimism is also very important…

Lets look at one of the TD profiles who is a natural Pessimist. The Accumulator profile. They are the most risk averse of all the profiles and they commit to thorough research and analysis before making a decision. They take more time to check out what works and what doesn’t and when they make a decision that the time is right to do something, you can depend on them that the research is right.

Without Accumulators, teams can rush into plans and new ideas, without fully considering the consequences and risks, or knowing all the details.

By the way, the richest man in the world today is an Accumulator!

“It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you’ll do things differently”

Warren Buffett

I hear organisations encouraging staff to be more positive and they ask their pessimists to communicate in a ‘more positive way’ – you know what, trying to tell someone that its going to rain at 11 o clock in a positive way, is just not that easy.  Fact is, the research shows its going to rain at 11. If you don’t listen to the warnings and take an umbrella, guess what, you are going to get wet. This is what pessimists do so beautifully. They can prevent you and your business from getting soaked because they know when the rain is coming!

Mike Harris, founder of Egg.com and Mercury, once told me, that in his initial planning stages with new ventures (he is a Creator) he always seeks a group of pessimists to run his ideas by. They tell him exactly what will go wrong and why people won’t want to buy it/use the service. He then takes their feedback and reshapes his plans to incorporate the challenges they see and he has built several Billion pound businesses!

“Both Optimists and Pessimists contribute to our society. The optimist invented the airplane and the pessimist the parachute”

GB Stern

 


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